Thursday, January 18, 2007

My Own: God's Promise

Due to low memory space ( less than 5%) I've been forced to go though all the photos on my hard drive and delete those not worthy of being posted on fotki (ok, between you and me, I may have saved a few more than that.) I admit, I AM a picture pack-rat, I have a NO DELETE clause, and I save pictures I find on the web and it probably doesn't help that I also download music, like crazy, in full albums. So yes, I have low memory, REALLY low memory, and I'm patiently awaiting an upgrade( Oh, Benny, please!! :) Anyway, my point in tell you all of this is that I went through my pics and low and behold, I found this-

Ok, so there is a rainbow right? Look closer, not only is there one, there are two rainbows. The rest of the picture really doesn't matter all that much, although it isn't a bad view of my street, and the sun has made awesome lighting on the trees. There are two of my brother's houses and then a basketball hoop that's in my driveway.

Here is the other end of that same rainbow- now, keep in mind I'm only standing on my back porch, I have only turned, I didn't have to go to another view point or anything.


Although, there isn't the tail to the second rainbow, it ws pretty amazing to see the beginning and the end of "God's Covenant". I have never again seen anything like that.

4 comments:

Don said...

A marvelous looking rainbow. And a fine picture to discover in your picture reduction.

My Marrakech said...

We recently saw a double rainbow here in our garden. It was so incredible that we all just stood outside with our jaws open, admiring.

Don said...

I ran across some informaiton I thought you'd find interesting It was news to me:: "Sometimes we see two rainbows at once, what causes this? We have followed the path of a ray of sunlight as it enters and is reflected inside the raindrop. But not all of the energy of the ray escapes the raindrop after it is reflected once. A part of the ray is reflected again and travels along inside the drop to emerge from the drop. The rainbow we normally see is called the primary rainbow and is produced by one internal reflection; the secondary rainbow arises from two internal reflections and the rays exit the drop at an angle of 50 degrees° rather than the 42°degrees for the red primary bow. Blue light emerges at an even larger angle of 53 degrees°. his effect produces a secondary rainbow that has its colors reversed compared to the primary."

Intisar said...

Thank you for thinking of me, Don! That is very interesting. Isn't it amazing how God works?